Sunday, October 6, 2013

Federation Space is back on e23

Federation Space was my introduction to the Starfleet Battle universe. My original set was partially lost between the 1980ish purchase date and today. E23 is the best service for old school gamers.
The original set featured a 16 page rule book, a map, one tactical display map, 5 organizational charts, 432 counters and two dice. The E23 version includes everything but the dice. (Hint, hint! I’d buy e23, SFB and ADB themed dice.)
When printing out my new copy, I was instantly reminded why this is my favorite Task Force Game: the dense background information to the game system. Out of sixteen pages, the first three beautifully describe the game universe. “Shields flashed electric blue” reminds me of the smell of ozone and the rattle of dice.
During the printing process, I discovered that I still had my original counters, with the exception the blue Federation.
I can’t tell you how many hours I have spent playing this game as a child, I can hardly wait to introduce this to my kids.
This game is very rich in background details while having a simple set rules. The beauty of this game is the breakdown of basic rules and scenarios that lead to more advanced rules, scenarios and optional rules. Replay away!
Additionally, Federation Space can be used to supplement Starfleet Battles.
After spending the weekend rereading the rules, I plan to print up the cards, maps and get playing again this week.

Thursday, October 3, 2013

Star Smuggler

One of the my first experiences with role playing and tactical games was a little game called Star Smuggler. It came with little cardboard tokens for characters, tiles for worlds and a rich background of information on the Smuggler Mini-verse. I spent hours, days and weeks playing.
Now you can too. Dwarfstar Games has contacted the author, Dennis Sustare and made arrangements to host digital files of the game. Check it out here. Mr. Sustare was never paid for this game yet still granted permission for digital distribution to Dwarfstar. Be kind and follow the generous agreement.
Update: I like to sketch up alternate ships for this game. Here is my Buffalo Class Transport.

Pilotage: 6 cu
Turrets x2: 2 cu each with weapons, 6 cu without
Crew Quarters: 24 cu
Bay 1: 43 cu
Bay 2: 43 cu
Boat Bay 1: 40 cu
Boat Bay 2: 40 cu
Engineering: 16 cu
8 Hyperchargers, no secret compartments.


Tuesday, June 25, 2013

xPud – How to Connect to Wifi

xPud is a nice little OS. But it has an issue with hidden ssid’s.
Actually, there is nothing wrong with the OS, it’s all you. No seriously, I mean it. In xPud, you are a super user all the time. That means the normal sudo iwconfig “fails”.
What true linux user runs in super user all the time? Well, you are with xPud.
What linux user radiates their ssid? No one, and with this information you won’t have to either.
So the correct usage of iwconfig for getting connected a hidden ssid is:
iwconfig wlan0 essid “insertnamehere” key “insertpasswordhere”
Easy, eh?

Thursday, June 20, 2013

Cubify

Cubify is a simple 3D printer with software called Invent.
I will review the software and printer shortly, but first I want to share some troubleshooting tips.
If you stumble across this error message:
"Oh noes!! Cubify Invent fall down go boom"
It is time to update your video drivers. This error is remarkably un-descriptive so you will have to take my word for it.
This error bit me on a computer that was downgraded from Windows 7 to XP. (Who the heck does that?)

Monday, June 3, 2013

Old Notes and Magical Items

I have a collection of notes on magic items and history for a campaign I ran a few decades ago. Over the next couple of weeks I will be posting them here. The first item is the Band of Roland and was likely written during a Black Flag phase I was going through. It has been updated for D&D 3.5.
As I mentioned, these items were used in a campaign and actually created by an persons in the game. This explains the comprehensive background on such a small magic items.

Monday, April 22, 2013

Windows 7 - Running Chkdsk at Start Up

In Windows, running a disk check can clear up many problems. Many small glitches can be cleared up with the chkdsk command.
Setting it up in the command prompt is easy, but counter intuitive. Open the Command Prompt by clicking the windows Icon and typing cmd and enter in the box.
Now type chkdsk /f C:
Windows does the usual thing and tells you can't do that here.
Type in y for yes and then exit the Command Prompt.
Now, reboot the machine and wait for all the checks to run. The normal "chkdsk C:" merely scans a disk, "chkdsk /f C:" scans and fixes problems, so you may be waiting awhile. Hopefully, it is worth it.