Monday, July 6, 2020

Scale Model - The Villein's Byre House - Part 9

And we are back. The nice thing about this project is, you can let it sit. There is no rush. 

In the last update, I tried to color some white stone with coffee. The results were inconsistent, this is some sort of chalky porous stone with little chips of quartz in it but it is not as porous as I thought. 


Let's call this four rows. The bottom row, I painted with different shades of brown, tan and grey. The second row from the bottom, are coffee treated stones that took some color. The third row are stones that took very little coffee color at all and the top row are completely untreated stone. To my eye and not the camera's, the third row is not as shock white as the untreated stones and I could use them but probably won't. 

When doing scale models, there is a trick to colors. Your brain does not think that you are looking at a tiny version of an object. Instead, it believes that you are seeing a full size object very far away. And in the atmosphere, a distance object is not only smaller, it's blueish. 

The Space Shuttle on video is great example of this color change in action. It's white. When you see the crew enter through the side door, clearly, the shuttle side is white. When the camera is moved back the white exterior becomes grey with tones of blue. As it lifts off and travels a great distance from the camera, it becomes bluer. And on approach to the ISS, it is back to brilliant white, no matter how far away it is. It's the air and the background colors that make it change. This is why blood looks lousy on figures, because it's never the right color. 

So, I will have to shade these rocks blueish to make them look "real". Just a smidgen. I'll come back to them later. 

Now for the walls. I'll be using sheets of basal for this. 

I didn't crop this image so you can see how large the piece of balsa is. It is sufficiently to cover the entire side of the house, but then the grain would be wrong. I want that grain going up and down. 
Yes, I will have to make many cuts to do this, but only four. The middle of the rectangle will have door in it. By running up and down, it looks more like what people expect. 

Think of siding. When people use aluminium, it often has a grain that goes side to side because it can. It's just stamped into the metal. If you tried that wood, you'd have to work hard to either accentuate how the pieces fit together, hid the connections or have something that looks ramshackle. Side to side grain is "rich" and a byre house shouldn't have details of luxury. The design still exists because of it's ease of construction and repair. So up and down. 

Technically, if this is something from 1300 or 1400s, then this is would be a "rich" person's house. The plague took care of that by tearing society up a bit. The devastation allowed those locked to land serfs to negotiate labor costs. It was a shock to their "betters" because if those landlords wanted something done, the labor pool had collapsed so you need to discuss who was getting what. Negotiate or you're project gets cut. 

Speaking of cuts, I measured the distance I will need to cover. It's about 1 and 7/8th high. To do this, I just dropped in a piece of index card and drew a line. Now when I cut the card, I'll end up with a cutting template which forces the idea of measure twice and cut once. 


Next post, placing the walls and doors. 

For those wishing to source their balsa from Amazon, they have a few choices. I like the Small, Random packs of balsa because I use it all the time and draw inspiration from the oddly shaped bits. 

No comments:

Post a Comment